Tag Archives: bristol

dirtysquatter:

“The Battle of Stokes Croft”

The eviction of our anti-Tesco occupation was dubbed “The Battle of Stokes Croft” by the local newspaper, The Evening Post Pest. We even made it to the national news!

You can see a full rundown of the press coverage here.

Banksy on the side of Thekla, a club-boat in Bristol.  Found under the grim reaper tab but it’s more Charon than that guy.

Anti-EDL protestors (We Are Bristol organised demonstration at the Bristol Bridge and as the camera pans to the right a group of LGBT activists [judging from the flags]) voice their displeasure at the EDL as they march through Bristol.

Some 250 EDL arrived in the city, the best that their national call out could muster, to spread their message of hatred and racism.  They were greeted by some 1500 on the WAB demonstration, along with other action taken by groups such as Bristol Antifa on the day.

Bristol Pride, which happened on the same day, was a great success and wasn’t disrupted by the racist thugs.

Statue of Edmund Burke in Bristol city centre, vandalised by some hoodlums.

Tory hanging with the kids, playing some yoyo, being one of the people.

Photo courtesy of Olivia Cowley, taken on the day of the anti-EDL protests in Bristol.

Tagged London but this was done on West Moreland House in Bristol.  Pshaw.

Link

What’s going for it? When the revolution comes, it’ll probably start here. The people of Stokes Croft have already re-enacted the storming of the Bastille, with a newly arrived branch of Tesco Express standing in for the benighted jail in last year’s Battle of Stokes Croft. They live their ideals round these parts. What was a few years ago a scruffy lair of crackheads and clubs has been spirited into Bristol’s Most Bohemian Neighbourhood, magnificently free of chain stores, alive with alternative ways of living, from the Classic’s free shop (like an un-Multi-Coloured Swap Shop) to splendid gallery activists the Peoples Republic of Stokes Croft, who seem to want to go the whole Passport To Pimlico hog. Thing is, this isn’t anti-capitalism old-style, with hair shirt and poor personal hygiene, but with sassy glamour. The streets are painted in vast, colourful murals. The local cinema, the Cube, might be a not-for-profit “microplex” collective circa 1975, but its seats are plush and it sells delicious homemade cola. And there’s a pretty flower shop. (Flowers of Stokes Croft, we salute you! A revolution must have flowers.)

Full article.

OH MY FUCK.

>When the revolution comes, it’ll probably start here.

>When the revolution comes, it’ll probably start here.

>When the revolution comes, it’ll probably start here.

Guardian you ever go down in my estimation.

As if the irony was lost on us.  Economic crisis, fuelled by subprime lending in the housing market, so lets write a series of articles titled “let’s move to …”

Feature a region and laud it as being “anti-capitalist” in a new mode.  You know, that new mode in which the best thing to do as an anti-capitalist is to go buy a house?*  As if it wasn’t fucking moronic enough with shit like the PRSC going on ego trips they’re now the prime advert for disenfranchised yuppies to participate in consumerist anti-capitalism.  ”Purchase this lovely three bedroom flat in the centre of town!  Housing prices are on the up because all you wankers have far too much money to spend but it’s oooookay!  Now you guys are all here the working class people of colour who grew up on these streets can’t afford the rent; so you won’t have to pass them on the streets!  The revolution starts in the workers co-op run restaurants guys so make sure you get your vegan nut roast while it’s hot!  Buy your way into this bohemian anti-capitalist utopia!  Obviously the revolution will have nothing to do with organising towards workplace resistance: you can now buy this former squat decorated on the outside with authentic graffiti!  There was a riot when the place was kicked out and now you can buy your way into this TOTALLY AWESOME COMMUNITY OF RESISTANCE!”

Fuck OFF Guardian.

Go fuck yourself with your disrespectful sensationalist bullshit.

*I’m not saying that not buying a house is a spectacularly anti-capitalist thing to do either it’s just fucking surreal.  ”Look the housing market fucked over the western economy so lets go buy specifically geographically located houses so that we can hang around people similarly annoyed about it.”

Let’s move to Stokes Croft, Bristol

noellejt:

Damn, I miss Bristol.

(This was my exit through the Bear Pit.)

unmasktheweb:

© Zones.Heera 

Awesome meeting in Bristol this friday, please reblog and spread the word!

John Carlos, famous as one of the athletes who gave black power salutes at the 1968 Olympics, recently said “My life has not been about winning medals, it’s about being a freedom fighter.”

John Carlos is coming to Bristol to speak out against the English Defence League who want to bring their message of hate and to march in Bristol on July 14th.

John Carlos has spoken spoken out against racism and prejudice at many forums around the world.  Come and hear what he has to say and join the campaign to oppose the EDL in Bristol.

Friday 1st June, 7pm

@ the Malcolm X centre, St Pauls.  141 City Road, BS2 8YH.

The Coup will be in Bristol on the 5th of April playing at gig at UWE! [link]

Profits from the gig are going towards the Palestinian scholarship appeal. [link]

£7 NUS, £8 advance and £10 on the door.  Available from here.

Do I need to explain how awesome this is going to be?  Please reblog to spread the word!

thepoliticalnotebook:

#OccupyBristol. This is The Political Notebook’s first submission from outside the US to the project to document Occupy movements! Taken and submitted by Jonathan Trollope of Bristol’s Occupy encampment a few days ago.

You can follow Jonathan on Twitter and Tumblr!

You can view the rest of The Political Notebook’s project to gather photography, documentation and experiences from the OWS movements nationwideEmail me, send me a message in my ask box, or tweet me a link to your photos to submit and keep it going! 

Flyer courtesy of the creative genius of Dan Newton.

mahoyage:

Batman – Bristol UK

sad-music-is-uplifting:

josiewantstoparty:

burning candy – bristol

This view is almost identical to the view from my sister’s place.

Link

samuelfromtheshire:

Streets in Bristol are being covered in graffiti as part of what is being claimed to be Europe’s biggest street art project.

A bank, a former magistrates court, even the back of a police station are being covered in graffiti and it is all legal.

Click the link to watch the video.

I’m not exceptionally impressed with this project.  I don’t really like the idea that graffiti should be organised into this fashion, subdued into having accepted formats in accepted locations.  It defeats the point of making a statement for all to see, without permission to do it.  Graffiti, in my eyes, is best when it’s a spontaneous expression of the community zeitgeist, not when it’s an expression of the council trying to hide how ugly it’s buildings are.

What MOST annoys me about this is that within the last year someone got assaulted by a police officer while they were graffing The Lanes (a pub with bowling alley, right on the corner of where this condoned graff is going up), which they were doing on the request of the management.  The police officer’s reaction wasn’t to ask “what are you doing, do you have permission” but instead to leap upon the artist in question.

Graffiti being condoned and requested by the bourgeois state in specific instances is just an attempt to tame and co-opt the artform, it doesn’t represent a progression in understanding nor true acceptance.

Improving Bristol’s streets with ‘posh’ graffiti

[A picture of The Mask carrying a Sony box with a speech bubble saying “Somebody stop me!” with the text by the side reading “Rob a shop, go to jail … rob a nation get a bonus.”  Graffiti in:]

marxandsparks:

Stokescroft, Bristol, UK – big love No Comment & Cee Cee 

bajanme:

Favourite mural. Stokes Croft Bristol.

fucknobristol:

(via Tesco Hit Hard In Riots!!! – HIJACK // Bristol Music Culture)

“Looks like Tesco on Cheltenham Road have had to call in the Specialists after their own security and the police have failed to protect the shop!”

This Tesco was the centre of a riot back in late April where it got smashed up and looted, there was a second riot outside there a week later while it was still boarded up.  Now in this latest spat of riots it got the windows smashed in again.  Last I saw it had a very sorry sign outside it to try and intrigue people in:

A Tesco (food shop), all the windows have been boarded up and a paper sign reads "we are open"

(Photo not mine)

The Tesco is located in a region called Stokes Croft which is a focal point for a lot of independent stores, community initiatives, political groups and so on.  The Tesco represents an aspect of the gentrification of the area, as middle class bohemian types increasingly call it home increasing housing prices and so on.  Along with the eviction of a squat opposite to coincide, Stokes Croft is a microcosm for the silent, passively waged conflict that exists within society.  But as with all passive conflicts, there have been times when it’s erupted into aggression.

And for some reason this amazes pundits every time.

imtheslime:

I will miss this wonderful place

In context with the complicit support of the government, the banks looted the nation’s wealth while destroying countless small businesses and brought the whole economy to its knees in a covert, clean manner, rather like organised crime.

Our reaction was to march and wave banners and then bail them out. These kids would have to riot and steal every night for a year to run up a bill equivalent to the value of non-paid tax big business has ‘avoided’ out of the economy this year alone.
They may not articulate their grievances like the politicians that condemn them but this is absolutely political. As for the ‘mindless violence’… is there anything more mindless than the British taxpayer quietly paying back the debts of others while contributing bullets to conflicts that we have absolutely no understanding of?

It’s mad, sad and scary when we have to take to the streets to defend our homes and businesses from angry thieving kids, but where are the police and what justice is ever done when the mob is dressed in pin stripe.

Massive Attack

Bristol based band Massive Attack post this statement to their facebook (in the link) along with a helicopter image of a burning car.  Their facebook page also contains an open forum for discussion on the Israel/Palestine debate.

Politically cued in and switched on music.  Fucking awesome. (You’re probably most likely to know Massive Attack for the song Teardrop)

Lowkey will be coming to Bristol on 21st September to do a gig at the club Eton and Haze!

This has been organised by UWE Live Music Society to be a part of freshers activities but it’s open to anyone, not just students, so the more the merrier!

Proceeds are going towards the Conflict Zone Bursary which was set up to give a full scholarship for a student in a conflict zone (in this case the proceeds will be directed for a student from Gaza) so that they have the opportunity to study for three years without the added stresses of living in a constant state of siege.  The skills they learn at university can then be taken back to their community and used to benefit and enrich.

I know the majority of my followers aren’t Bristol based but any reblogging of this would be awesome: it’ll help spread the word!  Six degrees of separation and all that …

(Picture is a click through link to the facebook group, or just clicky)

ellentansey:

livingispolitical:

fucknobristol:

Bristol Riots 1932 (via Bristol riots: plus ça change « Bristol Culture)

The photograph [above] is of Bristol men rioting in Old Market Street on February 23, 1932, as some 3,000 unemployed engaged in running battles with the police as they tried to march down to the city centre, led by the National Unemployed Workers Movement. Police baton-charged protesters outside Trinity police station and along Old Market.” … The Evening Post stated, “There were no deaths, but some 20 men were treated for minor injuries.

Interesting how casualties were reported. Is it a recent development in reporting of protests that only police injuries are reported and not injuries to protesters or bystanders?

Relatively recent.  The first time a police officer was killed in a riot, the person that did it was tried and admitted his guilt.  The jury acquitted him for justified homicide and the community gave him an award (or it may have been a medal?).

There was a time when people realised that riots were the only way the working classes would have their voices heard.  Then they created the police force, and people realised they only existed to suppress public unrest without using the military (which was problematic for a whole load of reasons).

Don’t they have a riot every day in St Paul’s? Or is that just when they aren’t busy in Stoke’s Croft? 😉

Every other day 😛

Actually in so far as I’m aware it’s just been the one night of substantial unrest so far in Bristol, along with a little bit of stuff going on last night when the fash thought they’d “help out” the police but I wasn’t there to see what went on with that.  Apparently there’s a group of fash “patrolling” Bristol tonight but the police have it more than under control here so they’re either a) causing trouble themselves or b) petting their own egos.

fucknobristol:

Bristol Riots 1932 (via Bristol riots: plus ça change « Bristol Culture)

The photograph [above] is of Bristol men rioting in Old Market Street on February 23, 1932, as some 3,000 unemployed engaged in running battles with the police as they tried to march down to the city centre, led by the National Unemployed Workers Movement. Police baton-charged protesters outside Trinity police station and along Old Market.” … The Evening Post stated, “There were no deaths, but some 20 men were treated for minor injuries.

Interesting how casualties were reported. Is it a recent development in reporting of protests that only police injuries are reported and not injuries to protesters or bystanders?

Relatively recent.  The first time a police officer was killed in a riot, the person that did it was tried and admitted his guilt.  The jury acquitted him for justified homicide and the community gave him an award (or it may have been a medal?).

There was a time when people realised that riots were the only way the working classes would have their voices heard.  Then they created the police force, and people realised they only existed to suppress public unrest without using the military (which was problematic for a whole load of reasons).

Link

r-i-o-t:

 

  1. 0235:

    More on the situation in Bristol. A spokeswoman for Avon and Somerset police said a number of shops and vehicles have been damaged and several main roads have been closed “to allow officers to take control of what is currently a volatile situation”.

  2. 0225:

    The BBC’s Tamsin Curnow, in Bristol, says police there have reported disorder in the last few hours. Shops and cars have been damaged in several areas, including the city centre, St Pauls, Stokes Croft and St Werburghs. Officers are now working to keep people out of the city centre, urging them to go home. Most of the damage was caused by about 150 people who moved around the city centre in small groups, police say.

Is This Terrorism?: 0235: More on the situation in Bristol. A spokeswoman for Avon and…

wander-unlost answered your question: wander-unlost reblogged your photo:…

I agree with you I was just surprised noone had reported anything! I’m interested to see how it’s covered considering now the issues you said

Listening in on my housemate watching the BBC news coverage, the anchor went with the old gem “and of course outside groups could’ve come in and hijacked the protest …”

This line is a particular favourite of mine.  It gets thrown around so much.

During the student demonstrations, especially Millbank, the accusation was thrown out that “violence” was instigated by anarchist groups that had come in to subvert the protest.  Which firstly presumes that students can’t be anarchist and anarchists can’t be students, and secondly it functions as a hook to say “ok, so the actual protest may have validity and freedom of speech is important, but now we’re going to isolate and demonise the people who use direct action. They’re not part of the protest movement, so lets ignore the purpose of the protest to talk about that for a week.”

A similar thing happened in Stokes Croft (which is a very small area right next to Bristol’s city centre) where people complained about people present at the riots as not being people who live in Stokes Croft and not really knowing what the community is like, blah blah blah.  While a hell of a lot of people have to go through Stokes Croft to get to the centre, it’s in the middle of a bubbling variety of communities and acts as a focal hub for much of the broader area.

But again the tactic by the press is to isolate and demonise.  The danger of this tactic is that this makes it easier for the government and police to “legitimise” stronger tactics, stricter laws, to defend against this specific “threat” (whereas in reality riots are an conflation of general will.  A few angry people can’t spontaneously start a riot within a peaceful protest without there being a firmer basis for it) however these tactics are invariably used to broaden the oppression, it becomes easier to attack and delegitimise peaceful protests and protests on other matters.  This style of media reporting plays into the encroachment of clamping down on civil rights across the spectrum (sort of like how when the US increased their budget for counter-terrorism, a significant portion of that was spent on riot control gear).